A Currenter iPhone Product Lineup

Apple's iPhone product line: the iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 5S and 5C.Last year Apple released two new phones instead of one with the iPhone 5C taking over as the top of the line along with the 5C as the low cost phone instead of just moving the iPhone 5 down to $100-with-contract spot.

The 4S then slid down to be the free-with-contract phone which meant Apple was competing at the low end of the smart phone market with a device already two years out of date.

For customers it meant their brand spanking new phone will be four years out of date by the time they are eligible for an upgrade.

With the introduction of the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus yesterday, last year’s 5S and 5C move down to the cheep and free price points. Both the 4S and 5 are gone with the oldest iPhone in the lineup only one generation back.

Before the old street trees were cut down on Castro Street for the sidewalk widening project, posters were taped to them asking they be kept and incorporated into the new design.

Besides being year late, it’s a compromise the city made in rebuilding Valencia Street and proved to be a problem. The trees that were once sat near the edge of the edge of the sidewalk are now right in the middle of the walkway.

During the community design process for Castro Street, the City botanist didn’t have to do much advocacy for starting over. It’s only a short walk down to Valencia Street where we can see examples of it set up each way on different blocks. We also didn’t have very many trees before anyway. Many of the tree-wells were empty and those that were filled had a mismatched set of trees ranging in species, age, and health.

If history is a guide, the street won’t see a major overhaul for at least a century. The trees will be mature enough to be above us and providing share within a decade. At least in my groups at the community workshops, most people took the 10 year view of what the new Castro Street will be like once it’s grown in a bit.

After six months of construction on Castro Street the sidewalks are nearly done, most of the utilities have been replaced or rebuilt, a new foundation for the street is being laid (the crown of the street had been so extreme the center of the hump in the middle of the street was a few feed above the sidewalk), and now that the essentials are winding down, the extras are going in.

Last week the Rainbow Honor Walk plaques were unveiled and today the new street trees began to arrive.

The widened sidewalks on the rebuilt Castro Street have nearly all been paved. Even though the street and sidewalk have been the bulk of the work, it’s only now that the sidewalk is finished the amenities that make this a redesign and not just a repaving can be added.

Over the last few days the first Rainbow Honor Walk plaques have been placed along 19th and Castro Streets. It’s an LGBT walk of fame that will eventually stretch down Market Street about a mile to reach the LGBT as more are added.

Instagram has brought time lapse to the iPhone with its new app hyperlapse. The app is incredible simple as described by Wired,

The elegantly bare UX belies the complexity of both what’s going on in the app, and what it replaces.

The first screen has only a record button. Once you’re done recording, the only thing you can do is choose what speed you want your video to run—the slider goes from 1x to 12x. Once that’s set, you can share the video directly to Facebook or Instagram.

I was given a sticker shortly after adopting my dog Disco saying a dog lived here, but it was badly designed with blanks for the number of cats (0) and dogs (1) living here.

I designed my own based on the Transport for London’s design standards, lifting the flames and phrasing of the first line directly from the Tube signage manual. I also wanted to add his name and gender so any first responders can call to him by name.

I was given a sticker shortly after adopting my dog Disco saying a dog lived here, but it was badly designed with blanks for the number of cats (0) and dogs (1) living here.

I designed my own based on the Transport for London’s design standards, lifting the flames and phrasing of the first line directly from the Tube signage manual. I also wanted to add his name and gender so any first responders can call to him by name.

Blurb Stories

I’m very happy to see the launch of a recent design project: a marketing blog for the independent self-publishing service Blurb.

The old Blurb Blog (still live) was a typical corporate blog that had become a dumping ground for news, product announcements, events, and partner promotions that can all quickly become dated or even incorrect.

What they needed was a place to share all the fun and creative ways Blurb’s customers were using to share their stories, tips, advice, provide inspiration, and examples of what customers are doing with Blurb.

This needed more than a fresh visual design, this was a tear down.

Enter Blurb Stories, built from the ground up around that core idea of sharing what authors are doing with Blurb.

San Francisco’s Castro Street is under heavy construction. The street and sidewalk are being completely as part of a sidewalk widening project while the San Francisco AIDS Foundation has stripped a former video rental store down to it’s frame to build a new HIV/AIDS outreach center right in the center of our gay village.

This is the first contemporary building along on a retail strip that hasn’t seen new construction in about three decades now. The center will bring together several outreach and support programs that have outgrown their spaces elsewhere or never had a permanent home to begin with.

The Talking Headways podcast presents a special episode about Walt Disney:

While most people know Walt Disney as the creator of lovable characters like Mickey Mouse and movies like “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and “Fantasia,” Disney doesn’t get as much credit for his design of Disneyland. Turns out Disney made himself an expert on the subject.

Guests Sam Gennawey, an urban planner and author of three books on Walt Disney, and Tim Halbur, director of communications for the Congress for the New Urbanism, discuss in detail Walt’s focus on planning places for people in Disneyland, Disney World, and even Celebration, Florida.

The Talking Headways podcast presents a special episode about Walt Disney:

While most people know Walt Disney as the creator of lovable characters like Mickey Mouse and movies like “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” and “Fantasia,” Disney doesn’t get as much credit for his design of Disneyland. Turns out Disney made himself an expert on the subject.

Guests Sam Gennawey, an urban planner and author of three books on Walt Disney, and Tim Halbur, director of communications for the Congress for the New Urbanism, discuss in detail Walt’s focus on planning places for people in Disneyland, Disney World, and even Celebration, Florida.

The proposed design allows for a bit more vagary on the rider’s part. Coming at this as a visitor there’s a fare chance I know from a map or the directions I have on hand that my destination lays west of this station , I could navigate by the directional signs alone.

Under the existing signs I have to add the extra step of mapping which of the listed terminals is at the end of which direction. This adds complexity, thinking, and increases the chance of making a mistake: Wiehle-Reston East is the Western terminal of the Silver line (opening this Saturday!) got it?

D.C. Metro is reconsidering how it represents the direction and destination of trains as part of a bigger effort to improve the wayfinding and directional signage throughout the system.

Currently D.C. Metro uses the color and destination, but if you’re on a platform trying to figure out the direction, you need to first follow the line until the end, or the other end to identify which way it’s going.

Cardinal directions are not without their downsides and CityLab has taken a survey of the Many Languages of Transit Platform Signs.

More about the D.C. Metro proposals in the  Metrorail System Signage Design Concept Proposal (PDF).

The proposed design allows for a bit more vagary on the rider’s part. Coming at this as a visitor there’s a fare chance I know from a map or the directions I have on hand that my destination lays west of this station , I could navigate by the directional signs alone.

Under the existing signs I have to add the extra step of mapping which of the listed terminals is at the end of which direction. This adds complexity, thinking, and increases the chance of making a mistake: Wiehle-Reston East is the Western terminal of the Silver line (opening this Saturday!) got it?

D.C. Metro is reconsidering how it represents the direction and destination of trains as part of a bigger effort to improve the wayfinding and directional signage throughout the system.

Currently D.C. Metro uses the color and destination, but if you’re on a platform trying to figure out the direction, you need to first follow the line until the end, or the other end to identify which way it’s going.

Cardinal directions are not without their downsides and CityLab has taken a survey of the Many Languages of Transit Platform Signs.

More about the D.C. Metro proposals in the Metrorail System Signage Design Concept Proposal (PDF).

source: waylosing